Permits to ease parking woes for households

Lammas Walk near the Salvation Army building

Lammas Walk near the Salvation Army building

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Residential permits are to be introduced to a number of Leighton Buzzard streets, with some exceptions after objections were heard.

Parking permings are to be introduced in Lammas Road, Bedford Street, Grove Road, Grasmere Way and Old Road in order to assist residents struggling to park.

In a report prepared by Paul Mason, CBC’s assistant Highways director, it was stated: “There are ongoing parking pressures in many streets in Leighton-Linslade, which are caused by the general increase in car ownership and commuter parking associated with the railway station.”

The report added that “particular difficulties” had been reported at all five locations.

On Lammas Walk, The Salvation Army – which has been situated there for 40 years – raised an objection, claiming that many visitors who were elderly or disabled would stuggle if unable to park there.

But in response, CBC stated that many residents had reported The Salvation Army’s visitors were responsible for many of their parking difficulties.

CBC agreed with concerns over houses that already had allocated parking being included within the permit scheme, and it was agreed to remove them.

One complaint suggested that flats at 32-90 Old Road also be excluded from the scheme, as there was allegedly parking available at the building’s rear.

CBC rejected the concern as unfair and stated it was unclear if there was sufficient parking behind the building for the occupants.

Some concerns were also highlighted about the impact of parking from planned developments.

To this, CBC stated: “It is accepted that parking pressures are increasing and some of these are as a result of the council’s own actions.

“For example, as more on-street parking parking restrictions are introduced, this reduces opportunities for those without off-street parking and leads to a migrations of parking to roads that have not previously experienced problems.”