Leighton Children’s Theatre stages sellout charity shows

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Charity shows by more than 100 young performers were a smash hit.

Leighton Buzzard Children’s Theatre (LBCT) staged six performances of ‘Annie’ to raise money for the charity Dogs for Good. The assistance dog charity is celebrating its 30th anniversary this year.

It was an amazing effort by LBCT with more than 120 performers, six shows and three casts over the two days.

The show was staged at Vandyke Upper School on the last weekend of February, and reviewing the show, Tom Scudamore said it would “go down in the history books as a spectacular showcase for young people, their talents and commitment”.

A spokesman for the charity said they would like to thank director Sally Allsopp and everyone who performed in, and supported the show.

The event raised £1,511.95, with £1,000 being enough to sponsor a puppy.

The Dogs for Good spokesman added: “I understand that Sally is going to continue supporting the charity and try and raise an amazing £5,000 which will mean that they will be able to name the pup too.”

The part of Annie was brought to life by Imogen Turner, Isabella Kavanagh and seven-year-old India Turner.

Mr Scudamore added: “Fellow orphan Molly, who dares to humour Hannigan, was captured with grace by the polished Amelia Kendall, Jemma Parker-Naples and Eliza Walsh. As for the youth ensemble, this group of teenagers complimented their numerous chorus parts with individuality and uniformity.

“It was a charming spectacle to see the cast’s older players, a tight-knit group, whip through song after song, changing character from handsome mansion staff to energetic citizens of ‘NYC’.

“Miss Hannigan, an outrageously fun part to play, was performed with glorious abandon by the stern Molly Collins and unyielding Rebekah Beare. And leading man Jacob Townson made an excellent Oliver Warbucks.

“Here is a lovely big family full of generous citizens of our local towns who bring heart and passion to everything they do, and so, yet again, Sally Allsopp’s ethos for LBCT was brought to the audiences with love.”