Bedfordshire's stop and search community scrutiny panel needs more members

Bedfordshire's stop and search community scrutiny panel is looking for more members to help police the police.

The community scrutiny panel holds Bedfordshire Police to account on stop and search issues and helps improve the use of this important policing approach.

Bedfordshire's stop and search community scrutiny panel is looking for more members to join the meetings

Bedfordshire's stop and search community scrutiny panel is looking for more members to join the meetings

The panel is always open to promote what it does in the county and is inviting new people over the age of 16 - who live, work or study in Bedfordshire - to take part in the panel meetings.

Montell Neufville, chair of Bedfordshire police community scrutiny panel, said: “We represent the community of Bedfordshire often challenging police leaders on how the powers are used in the county.

"Panel members come from every walk of life, some with knowledge and experience some with a passion and many who are in education. All want to make a positive difference to their communities.

"The aim of the panel is to hold police to account for the use of stop and search powers. The main aim is to build confidence in policing, to ensure the powers are used in a way that builds this confidence, to support training of officers and to instil best practice."

Montell Neufville, chair of Bedfordshire police community scrutiny panel

Montell Neufville, chair of Bedfordshire police community scrutiny panel

The panel is made up of a representative group of around fifty people from across Bedfordshire, this includes males and females, people of different ethnicities and religions and people from different ages.

All panel members are trained, training is delivered by Montell Neufville in partnership with the Bedfordshire Police Community Cohesion Team.

The panel meets once every three months although panel members are expected to talk to their families, friends and colleges to understand any issues they may have, and then feed this to the panel.

Members are encouraged to attend two out of the four meetings per year.

Montell added: "We provide training and raise awareness of policing issues. Members constructively question officers’ use of tactics as well as give advice.

"Volunteers also carry out research into other forces, into data and into social justice to add to the knowledge of the panel. We also have sub groups where people can get more involved should they choose to.

"The overall benefit is better policing, greater confidence in policing by helping officers to explain tactics and to ensure that they focus on being efficient effective and fair in helping to keep communities safe."

If anyone is interested in joining the panel or finding out more information, email Montell Neufville on att10tive@gmail.com.