Tiddenfoot trees felled to protect rare acid grassland

Felled trees at Tiddenfoot
Felled trees at Tiddenfoot

A number of trees around Tiddenfoot Lake have been felled by Central Beds Council to protect a patch of ‘rare acid grassland’ from the shade.

But visitors to the beauty spot have been less-than-impressed by the piles of felled tree logs lying on site.

Felled trees at Tiddenfoot

Felled trees at Tiddenfoot

One man said: “For once, we’ve got something that dog walkers and members of the angling club agree on!

“The trees by the lake are beautiful and there was no sign or display to tell us why they were being cut down.

“It’s such a great place for so many people to enjoy, it’s so frustrating that nobody knows. The dog walkers, the anglers and the general public have this little slice of heaven to enjoy wildlife.”

Depending on its type, rare acid grassland can support a wide range of invertebrates to thrive including solitary wasps, butterflies and grasshoppers, as well as certain plant species.

Felled trees at Tiddenfoot

Felled trees at Tiddenfoot

Tiddenfoot was famously one of the first lakes stocked with catfish on the 1960s when the Duke of Bedford imported them from his lake in Woburn Abbey – where they had damaged his ornamental ducks.

A spokesman for CBC said: “This is part of ongoing tree works at Tiddenfoot, which is scheduled to be completed by Wednesday. The trees are being removed to allow for the recovery and expansion of the small area of rare acid grassland present at this site which was being shaded out by the dense tree canopy.”