Talented mum from Great Brickhill making village proud in More4’s The Great Pottery Throw Down

A creative businesswoman from Great Brickhill will be on your television screen tonight as part of More4’s The Great Pottery Throw Down.

Rosa Wiland Holmes, 44, is one of eleven remaining contestants battling out for the top prize under the roof of the beautiful 19th-century Middleport Potter factory.

Rosa and right, with her fellow contestants, presenter Mel and judges Sue and Keith Credit: Mark Bourdillon/Channel 4 images.

Rosa and right, with her fellow contestants, presenter Mel and judges Sue and Keith Credit: Mark Bourdillon/Channel 4 images.

The mother-of-two, who runs classes from her home studio, is delighted to be featured in the show - and was even more excited to meet the other “like-minded” contestants who share her passion.

Rosa said: “The first day was daunting and nervous, but I was excited to start.
“Both judges had different skills and worked well as a team. I have learnt to plan better and improve my work to the best standard possible.

“Meanwhile, [presenter] Melanie Sykes was so nice, so down to earth and supportive and kind – and so funny. I want her to be my best friend!”

The first programme, which aired last Wednesday, challenged the contestants to create a breakfast set and egg cups, while tonight’s challenge will see them create elaborate chess sets and miniature vases.

Rosa. Credit: Mark Bourdillon/Channel 4 images.

Rosa. Credit: Mark Bourdillon/Channel 4 images.

Rosa added: “I really want to get my work shown in the art world, in galleries, exhibitions, and try to get as much exposure as possible after the show is aired.”

The hardworking mum was born in the Danish capital, Copenhagen, and lived on the small island of Bornholm with her sister, mother and father from the age of ten. 

Rosa met her husband, a Londoner, whilst she was studying an MA in Fashion in Denmark and moved to the UK to pursue a career as a ladies-wear designer for high street brands.

While pregnant, she created her own children’s clothing line inspired by English and Scandinavian designs.

But it was during a taster adult education class that Rosa discovered her passion for pottery.

She said: “I love drawing; my father was a sculptor and my grandmother painted porcelain, so I wanted to combine all three mediums.”

“I like to make art: stand out pieces inspired by nature that appeal to the senses with textures.

“Throwing is more of a challenge – you can only think about that at the time and you get instant satisfaction. But I love hand building for the organic forms and abstract shapes.”

Rosa’s students, her husband and two children are all very excited to see their local pottery master on the show, and are hoping she’s got what it takes to get to the final.

But you will have to tune in tonight to see if she can impress judges Keith Brymer Jones and Sue Pryke.

The Great Pottery Throw Down is aired on More4 on Wednesdays at 9pm.