Linslade actor stars in Sky's brand new movie 'Prancer - a Christmas Tale' which premiers this Sunday

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The film premiers on Sky from Sunday, December 4.

A Linslade actor is starring in Sky's brand new movie 'Prancer - a Christmas Tale', bringing audiences a festive reminder that no-one's too old to believe in magic!

Sarah-Jane Potts, 46, plays hardworking mum, Claire, who travels back to America to see her father, Bud - played by none other than Oscar nominee James Cromwell of Babe fame. Bud has recently lost his wife, but when he and granddaughter, Gloria, meet a mysterious reindeer, a heartwarming journey is in store.

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Sarah-Jane told the LBO: "It's a feel good Christmas movie about heart, and family and love, and how you can find magic in the strangest of places. Gloria is my daughter in the story - I'm American and she's British. I get a call to say my Dad has had a fall, so my character decides to go back to make sure he's OK. It's a lovely story between the grandfather and granddaughter, one that gives you faith in the human condition."

The movie poster, and right 'Bud and Claire' (James Cromwell and Sarah-Jane Potts). Sarah-Jane loved the change from her usual gritty roles to starring in a feel-good family film - "something everyone needs right now!"The movie poster, and right 'Bud and Claire' (James Cromwell and Sarah-Jane Potts). Sarah-Jane loved the change from her usual gritty roles to starring in a feel-good family film - "something everyone needs right now!"
The movie poster, and right 'Bud and Claire' (James Cromwell and Sarah-Jane Potts). Sarah-Jane loved the change from her usual gritty roles to starring in a feel-good family film - "something everyone needs right now!"

Sarah-Jane describes working with James as "just amazing" and admires his strong stand for veganism, while she found Darcey Ewart, who plays her on-screen daughter, to be a "fantastic" young actor.

"She's so real and we had such fun," said Sarah-Jane. "We wanted to seem as genuine as possible, so we worked really hard on building a relationship. We spent time together at the hotel, ate together, had life chats, all with her mum chaperoning her, who was brilliant."

The crew shot the film in the beautiful woodland setting of Râșnov, Romania, and with real snow and a real reindeer, the story brings some authentic Christmas charm.

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"The reindeer, Elin, had an amazing handler, Vedran. I think reindeers in big crowds have an instinct to run, but she seemed very professional," smiled Sarah-Jane.

Back home, viewers may know the Linslade star from dramas such as Waterloo Road, Holby City, and Sugarush, and for playing Lauren in the original movie of Kinky Boots.

Meanwhile, during lockdown, Sarah-Jane had the idea for her first (YouTube) film as writer/director - 'The Magician 4K' - which was filmed in 'Adam's Bottom' park, Leighton Buzzard.

Talking about her inspiration, Sarah-Jane said: "It's about a suicidal woman whose life is forever changed by a random act of kindness from a man called 'The Magician'. During lockdown I was in Budapest, and when I went for my daily exercise I would always see a juggler, although there was hardly anyone about. I thought what's he getting from that? He's doing it because he makes people smile...

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"Meanwhile, the Magician does funny little magic tricks, but you don't know if it's a trick or if it's really magic!"

Sarah-Jane lives in Linslade with her husband, Joe Millson, 48, who has also made short YouTube film called Care. She has one son, Buster, 18, and two step children, Jessica, 20, and Gabriel, 18.

(Buster is a musician – search ‘Buster: Outta Love on Spotify).

When she's not acting, you may also see Sarah-Jane working in the Room No9 cafe, while she was also proud to take part in the first Leighton Buzzard Film Festival.

Sarah-Jane concluded: "It's not easy trying to be an independent filmmaker, but it's necessary that we keep going because we need something different from homogenised mass studio productions. There needs to be a counterpoint."

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